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Recommended Conferences for Trichotillomania


As per available reports about 04 through its relevant journals, 03 Conferences, 102 Workshops are presently dedicated exclusively to Trichotillomania and about 197 articles are being published on Trichotillomania.

Trichotillomania also known as trichotillosis or hair pulling disorder) is an impulse disorder characterized by the compulsive urge to pull out one's hair, leading to noticeable hair loss and balding, distress, and social or functional impairment. It appears in the ICD chapter 5 on Mental and behavioural disorders and is often chronic and difficult to treat. Trichotillomania may be present in infants, but the peak age of onset is 9 to 13. It may be triggered by depression or stress. Owing to social implications the disorder is often unreported and it is difficult to accurately predict its prevalence; the lifetime prevalence is estimated to be between 0.6% and 4.0% of the overall population. Common areas for hair to be pulled out are the scalp, eyelashes, eyebrows, legs, arms, hands, nose and the pubic areas.The name, coined by French dermatologist François Henri Hallopeau, derives from the Greek: trich- (hair), till(en) (to pull), and mania ("madness, frenzy").

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Scope and Importance:
Trichotillomania Conference provides the scope for opportunities to learn progressed by international scientists and academicians. Trichotillomania Conference offers excessive quality content to suit the diverse professional development to treat people all over the globe. It is a perfect platform to discuss the current discoveries and developments in the field of Trichotillomania.

Trichotillomania is defined as a self-induced and recurrent loss of hair. It includes the criterion of an increasing sense of tension before pulling the hair and gratification or relief when pulling the hair. However, some people with trichotillomania do not endorse the inclusion of "rising tension and subsequent pleasure, gratification, or relief" as part of the criteria; because many individuals with trichotillomania may not realize they are pulling their hair, patients presenting for diagnosis may deny the criteria for tension prior to hair pulling or a sense of gratification after hair is pulled. Trichotillomania may lie on the obsessive-compulsive spectrum, also encompassing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), nail biting (onychophagia) and skin picking (dermatillomania), tic disorders and eating disorders. These conditions may share clinical features, genetic contributions, and possibly treatment response; however, differences between trichotillomania and OCD are present in symptoms, neural function and cognitive profile. In the sense that it is associated with irresistible urges to perform unwanted repetitive behavior, trichotillomania is akin to some of these conditions, and rates of trichotillomania among relatives of OCD patients is higher than expected by chance. However, differences between the disorder and OCD have been noted, including: differing peak ages at onset, rates of comorbidity, gender differences, and neural dysfunction and cognitive profile. When it occurs in early childhood, it can be regarded as a distinct clinical entity.

The scalp is the most common pulling site, followed by the eyebrows, eyelashes, face, arms, and legs. Some less common areas include the pubic area, underarms, beard, and chest. The classic presentation is the "Friar Tuck" form of vertex and crown alopecia. Children are less likely to pull from areas other than the scalp. People who suffer from trichotillomania often pull only one hair at a time and these hair pull episodes can last for hours at a time. Trichotillomania can go into remission-like states where the individual may not experience the urge to "pull" for days, weeks, months, and even years.

Other medical complications include infection, permanent loss of hair, repetitive stress injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, and gastrointestinal obstruction as a result of trichophagia. In trichophagia, people with trichotillomania also ingest the hair that they pull; in extreme (and rare) cases this can lead to a hair ball (trichobezoar). Rapunzel syndrome, an extreme form of trichobezoar in which the "tail" of the hair ball extends into the intestines, can be fatal if misdiagnosed.

Environment is a large factor which affects hair pulling. Sedentary activities such as being in a relaxed environment are conducive to hair pulling. A common example of a sedentary activity promoting hair pulling is lying in a bed while trying to rest or fall asleep. An extreme example of automatic trichotillomania is found when some patients have been observed to pull their hair out while asleep. This is called sleep-isolated trichotillomania.

Market Analysis:
Trichotillomania may be present in infants, but the peak age of onset is 9 to 13. It may be triggered by depression or stress. Owing to social implications the disorder is often unreported and it is difficult to accurately predict its prevalence; the lifetime prevalence is estimated to be between 0.6% and 4.0% of the overall population.

List of Best International Conferences:

Relevant Societies and Associations:
• Trichotillomania Learning Center
• The OCD Foundation
• North American Hair Research Society
• The Trichological Society
• Mental health America
• World Trichology Society
• Health Society of South Africa
• National Center for Biotechnology Information
• National Organization for Rare Disorders
• International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery

• Cigna
• Trichi Care LTD
• Tricho care Group LTD
• Tricho care Education LTD
• Tricho Hair Care
• Trichocare Diagnostics LTD
• Trichokare
• Tricho-Xp
• Tk Trichokare Novena SQ
• Tricho Lab

List of Related Journals:

  • Advancements in Genetic Engineering
  • Hair Therapy & Transplantation
  • Journal of Transplantation Technologies & Research
  • Journal of Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Research
  • Journal of Pigmentary Disorders
  • Anatomy & Physiology: Current Research

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 14th Sep, 2015

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