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Recommended Conferences for Integrated Pest Management

Integrated Pest Management


As per available reports about 20 Open Access Journals, 20 Conferences, 267 open access articles are presently dedicated exclusively integrated pest management and about 549 conference proceedings are being published on integrated pest management.


Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is an effective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices. IPM programs use current, comprehensive information on the life cycles of pests and their interaction with the environment. This information, in combination with available pest control methods, is used to manage pest damage by the most economical means, and with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment. The IPM approach can be applied to both agricultural and non-agricultural settings, such as the home, garden, and workplace. IPM takes advantage of all appropriate pest management options including, but not limited to, the judicious use of pesticides. In contrast, organic food production applies many of the same concepts as IPM but limits the use of pesticides to those that are produced from natural sources, as opposed to synthetic chemicals. IPM is not a single pest control method but, rather, a series of pest management evaluations, decisions and controls. In practicing IPM, growers who are aware of the potential for pest infestation follow a four-tiered approach. The four steps include:

1. Set Action Thresholds:
Before taking any pest control action, IPM first sets an action threshold, a point at which pest populations or environmental conditions indicate that pest control action must be taken. Sighting a single pest does not always mean control is needed. The level at which pests will either become an economic threat is critical to guide future pest control decisions.

2. Monitor and Identify Pests:
Not all insects, weeds, and other living organisms require control. Many organisms are innocuous, and some are even beneficial. IPM programs work to monitor for pests and identify them accurately, so that appropriate control decisions can be made in conjunction with action thresholds. This monitoring and identification removes the possibility that pesticides will be used when they are not really needed or that the wrong kind of pesticide will be used.

3. Prevention:
As a first line of pest control, IPM programs work to manage the crop, lawn, or indoor space to prevent pests from becoming a threat. In an agricultural crop, this may mean using cultural methods, such as rotating between different crops, selecting pest-resistant varieties, and planting pest-free rootstock. These control methods can be very effective and cost-efficient and present little to no risk to people or the environment.

4. Control:
Once monitoring, identification, and action thresholds indicate that pest control is required, and preventive methods are no longer effective or available, IPM programs then evaluate the proper control method both for effectiveness and risk. Effective, less risky pest controls are chosen first, including highly targeted chemicals, such as pheromones to disrupt pest mating, or mechanical control, such as trapping or weeding. If further monitoring, identifications and action thresholds indicate that less risky controls are not working, then additional pest control methods would be employed, such as targeted spraying of pesticides. Broadcast spraying of non-specific pesticides is a last resort.

OMICS International:
OMICS International is an Open Access Publications group which organizes International scientific conferences worldwide. This can be achieved through the support of 700 Open Access Journals, 50000 Editorial team, 1000 more scientific societies 21 Days rapid review process with valuable 3.5 Million readers conducting 300 scientific conferences per year.
In this way OMICS International Conferences are engraved to the marks of success in open access publishing & also in organizing scientific events. The OMICS International event participants are typically high-level decision makers representing various parts of the industry and many participants are repeaters who know each other.
Conferences and Symposiums of OMICS International enlightens your research path by gathering scientific professionals from across the globe to discuss the recent scientific discoveries done followed by the interactive sessions through B2B meetings and scientific partnering. The importance and significance of OMICS International Conferences can be gauged by the fact that it has made huge advancements over the course of time and is continuing to influence various sectors.

Scope and Importance:
The integrated pest management has an important role in sustainable agriculture by providing maximum economic yields to the farmer, while improving or maintaining the production site and protecting the environment. The procedures to improve economic yields while reducing inputs include: the integration of pesticides with cultural techniques for disease control; and biological, behavioral, and environmental controls of pests such as weeds. Especially biological and biotechnological control methods have a vital importance as the alternatives to chemical control in integrated pest management. Biotechnology promises to have a major impact on IPM through the use of recombinant DNA techniques to genetically engineer microbes for the control of diseases, insects, and weeds, and to generate plants that resist insects, pathogens, and herbicides.
Examples of each management procedure follow:
Cultural controls: crop variety selection or host-plant resistance, double cropping and/or crop rotation patterns, minimum or reduced tillage, use of organic fertilizers, and prescription pesticide application.
Biological controls: natural pathogens or predators of insects and weeds. Several cultural techniques mentioned above (such as variety selection) relate directly to biological control.
Behavioural controls: release of sterile insects, pheromone traps, and development of lethal natural products that attract insects. These techniques have only recently received attention in IPM; they relate to pest behaviour modification based on insect communication.
Biotechnology: microorganisms with novel features that are currently impacting IPM strategies include viruses and bacteria that were developed for control of insects, weeds, and/or fungal pathogens. These practices are likely to impact substantially on IPM procedures regarding the development of plants having novel characteristics such as herbicide tolerance and insect resistance.
Environmental controls: alterations of soil pH, moisture status, use of topography, temperature, and light intensity are among the environmental approaches. However, such manipulations are difficult to perform. While closely related to cultural practices, environmental controls relate to alterations in the physical environment to maintain yields and reduce stress.
Finally, many different IPM options should be assembled into a stepwise approach that evaluates each practice, and recommends the most appropriate choice. The best options for a specific cropping system will always depend on the probability of desired result; thus, computerized applications are an obvious choice for future IPM planning and implementation.
Global pesticide use has grown over the past 20 years to 3.5 billion kg/year, amounting to a global market worth $45 billion. The external costs of pesticides are $4–$19 (€3–15) per kg of active ingredient applied, suggesting that IPM approaches that result in lower pesticide use will benefit, not only farmers, but also wider environments and human health.

List of Best International Conferences:

1. Plant Science Conference, September 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA

2. 5th Agriculture and Horticulture Conference

June 27-29, 2016 Cape Town, South Africa

3. 2nd Food Safety and Regulatory Affairs Conference, June 06-08, 2016 London, UK

4.  Euro Biomass Conference, August 01-03, 2016 Birmingham, UK

5. 5th Biodiversity Conference, March 10-12, 2016 Madrid, Spain

6. 2nd Geology Conference, April 21-22, 2016 Dubai, UAE

7. Pollution Control and Sustainable Environment Conference
April 25-26, 2016 Dubai, UAE

8. Plant Physiology Conference, June 09-11, 2016 Dallas, USA

9. 5th Earth Science and Climate Change Conference
July 25-27, 2016 Bangkok, Thailand

10. 6th Biotechnology Conference, October 05-07, 2015 New Delhi, India

11. World Bio Summit, November 02-04, 2015 Dubai, UAE

12. 1st Proximal Sensing Supporting Precision Agriculture Conference, Italy

13. Agricultural Statistics 2015 Conference, Malaysia

14. 5th Organic Agriculture Sciences Conference, Slovakia

15. 7th Crop Science Congress, China

16. 1st Plant Protection Congress 2015, Germany

17. Perennial Biomass Crops for a Resource Constrained World, Germany

18. Agriculture, Ecology and Biological Engineering Conference, Turkey

19. 3rd Sustainable Environment and Agriculture Conference, USA

20. 6th Agriculture and Animal Science Conference, China

21. Sustainable Agriculture Technologies Conference, Thailand

22. 3rd Food and Agricultural Sciences Conference, UAE

Relevant Associationa/Societies:

American Agricultural Law Association, USA
American Farm Bureau Federation, USA ‎
Ontario Association of Agricultural Societies, Canada
National Association of Wheat Growers, USA
African Rural and Agricultural Credit Association, Africa
American Association of Cereal Chemists, USA
American Poultry Association, USA
American Seed Trade Association, USA
Crop Science Society of America, USA
Western Society of Crop Science, USA
Crop and Weed Science Society, USA
Agriculture & Applied Economics Association, USA
Virginia Soybean Association, USA
American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, USA
The Royal Agricultural Society of England, UK
International Society for Horticultural Science, Belgium
The Horticultural Society of India, India
Ethiopian Horticulture Development Agency, Ethiopia
National Horticultural Society of France, France
Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture, New Zealand
Australian Organic Farming and Gardening Society, Australia
Wildflower Society of Western Australia, Australia
American Horticultural Society, USA
Massachusetts Horticultural Society, USA
International Food Policy Research Institute, USA
International Fund for Agriculture Development, Italy
Consortium for International Crop Protection, USA
Asian Association for Agricultural Engineering, China
Tropical Agricultural Association, UK
Canadian Society for Horticultural Science, Canada

Relevant Companies:

Dole Food Company, USA
Mycogen Seeds, USA
Kinze Manufacturing, Inc., USA
Seaboard Corporation, USA
Burpee Seeds, USA
Cargill, USA
Cavendish Farms, Canada
Chiquita Brands International, USA
ContiGroup Companies, Belgium
Fredericksburg Farmers Cooperative, USA
Riceland Foods, USA
Zeeland Farm Services, USA
Vermeer Company, USA
Dupoint, USA
Pioneer, USA
CABI, UK
Agria Corporation, China
AgriSA, South Africa
Agrium, USA
BASF, Germany
Alberta Wheat Pool, Canada
Bevo Agro Incorporated, Canada
Ceres Incorporated, Canada
Danisco, USA
Foundation for Agronomic Research, USA
Heritage Foods, India
MFA Incorporated, USA
Monsanto, USA
Swire Group, UK
The Mosaic Company, USA
Wayne Farms, USA

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 14th Sep, 2015

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