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Technology in Medicine


As per available reports about 33 Relevant journals, 71 Conferences, 27 National Symposiums are presently dedicated exclusively to Technology in and about 6 articles are being published on Technology in Medicine.

Modern medicine and technology seem inseparable. The discovery of X-rays by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen (1845-1923) in 1895 made it possible to look at internal organs of the body. This made it easier to diagnose broken bones, cancer, and other diseases. Not long after, Willem Einthoven (1860-1927), a Dutch physiologist, invented the first electrocardiograph. This device records the electrical activity of the heart muscles, making it possible to monitor for heart problems. Many of the advances have come in imaging enabling physicians to see the organs without opening the body.

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Scope and Importance

In today’s world, technology plays an important role in every industry as well as in our personal lives. Out of all of the industries that technology plays a crucial role in, healthcare is definitely one of the most important. This merger is responsible for improving and saving countless lives all around the world. Advancements in medical technology have allowed physicians to better diagnose and treat their patients since the beginning of the professional practice of medicine. Thanks to the continuous development of technology in the medical field, countless lives have been saved and the overall quality of life continues to improve over time.

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Modern medicine and technology seem inseparable. The discovery of X-rays by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen (1845-1923) in 1895 made it possible to look at internal organs of the body. This made it easier to diagnose broken bones, cancer, and other diseases. Not long after, Willem Einthoven (1860-1927), a Dutch physiologist, invented the first electrocardiograph. This device records the electrical activity of the heart muscles, making it possible to monitor for heart problems. In the mid-century catheters—thin hollow tubes that can be used to drain fluids or put in medicine—were inserted into the heart and liver. Many of the advances have come in imaging enabling physicians to see the organs without opening the body. Technologies include ultrasound imaging, computerized tomography (CT-scans), positron-emission tomography (PET scans), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs). Diagnostics, while still an art, has become a science too.

X-rays, of course, are a form of radiation, which is dangerous to the body. Radiologists learned to use the lowest doses possible in imaging. They also learned to use targeted X-rays and other forms of radiation to destroy unwanted cells. Thus radiation has become a standard treatment for cancer. Perhaps no field has been affected so much by technology as surgery. The various scanning technologies have guided the surgeon into the depths of the body, allowing radical invasive surgeries. It provides an artificial means of maintaining blood circulation, thus keeping patients alive while the surgeon operates on the stopped heart. This technique, called cardiopulmonary bypass, has made major heart surgeries almost routine, including the replacement of heart valves and the cardiac by-pass.  

Artificial organs are another major 20th century development. Although transplantation is the ideal, there are not enough organs for people who need them. Artificial organs can keep patients alive as they await surgery. The kidney dialysis machine is one of the earliest examples of this. The first artificial kidney was invented in 1913. Hemodialysis, which was pioneered by the Dutch-American scientist, now prolongs life for many people with kidney failure. Artificial hearts have also been developed. Unlike cumbersome dialysis machines, these are actually implanted in the body.

However, few recipients lived more than half a year. Other artificial hearts were developed to act as bridges, to keep patients alive until a real heart was available. Despite all these advances, there are still many diseases that lack adequate treatments. While many illnesses can be prevented, there are others that still devastate families and communities. And there are many people who lack access to adequate medical care for the diseases that can be cured or prevented.

Modern medicine and technology seem inseparable. The discovery of X-rays by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen (1845-1923) in 1895 made it possible to look at internal organs of the body. This made it easier to diagnose broken bones, cancer, and other diseases. Not long after, Willem Einthoven (1860-1927), a Dutch physiologist, invented the first electrocardiograph. This device records the electrical activity of the heart muscles, making it possible to monitor for heart problems. In the mid-century catheters—thin hollow tubes that can be used to drain fluids or put in medicine—were inserted into the heart and liver. Many of the advances have come in imaging enabling physicians to see the organs without opening the body. Technologies include ultrasound imaging, computerized tomography (CT-scans), positron-emission tomography (PET scans), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs). Diagnostics, while still an art, has become a science too.

X-rays, of course, are a form of radiation, which is dangerous to the body. Radiologists learned to use the lowest doses possible in imaging. They also learned to use targeted X-rays and other forms of radiation to destroy unwanted cells. Thus radiation has become a standard treatment for cancer. Perhaps no field has been affected so much by technology as surgery. The various scanning technologies have guided the surgeon into the depths of the body, allowing radical invasive surgeries. It provides an artificial means of maintaining blood circulation, thus keeping patients alive while the surgeon operates on the stopped heart. This technique, called cardiopulmonary bypass, has made major heart surgeries almost routine, including the replacement of heart valves and the cardiac by-pass.

Artificial organs are another major 20th century development. Although transplantation is the ideal, there are not enough organs for people who need them. Artificial organs can keep patients alive as they await surgery. The kidney dialysis machine is one of the earliest examples of this. The first artificial kidney was invented in 1913. Hemodialysis, which was pioneered by the Dutch-American scientist, now prolongs life for many people with kidney failure. Artificial hearts have also been developed. Unlike cumbersome dialysis machines, these are actually implanted in the body.

However, few recipients lived more than half a year. Other artificial hearts were developed to act as bridges, to keep patients alive until a real heart was available. Despite all these advances, there are still many diseases that lack adequate treatments. While many illnesses can be prevented, there are others that still devastate families and communities. And there are many people who lack access to adequate medical care for the diseases that can be cured or prevented.

Market Analysis:

The medical technology sector is weathering a perfect storm caused by three concurrent trends: the move toward value-based health care, growing regulatory pressures, and resource constraints within the industry itself. Companies must find new ways to create, deliver and capture value. Unfortunately, medical technology companies of all sizes face now significant resource constraints precisely when they need to be investing in new kinds of innovation. Financing has become increasingly scarce for small companies, while slowing growth has resulted in “lost” revenues of US$ 131 billion and “lost” R&D of US$12 billion between 2008 and 2012.

List of best International Conferences:

  1. 4th Nephrology Conference
    September 14-16, 2015, USA
  2. 3rd Endocrinology  Conference
    November  02-04,  2015, USA
  3. 11th Targeting  Diabetes  Conference
    October  17-19,  2016, Malaysia
  4. 6th Endocrinology  Conference
    November  28-30,  2016;  USA
  5. 6th Diabetes Conference
    November  02-04,  2015, UAE
  6. 8th Euro  Diabetes  Conference
    November  03-05,  2015, Spain
  7. 10th European  Diabetes  Conference
    July  14-16,  2016, UK
  8. 7th Indo Diabetes Conference
    November  23-25,  2015, India
  9. Thyroid Disorders  and treatment Conference
    February 29-March 02, 2016,  USA
  10. 9th Diabetologists Conference
    June 06-08, 2016, USA. 
  11. 2nd  Hormones  and  Steroids  Conference
    June  23-25,  2016, USA
  12. 11th Asia  Pacific  Diabetes  Conference
    July  11-13,  2016, Australia
  13. 12th Diabetes  Conference
    September  29-October  1,  2016,  Canada
  14. 13th Diabetes  Conference 
    August  08-10,  2016, UK
  15. Metabolic Syndrome Conference
    October  20-22,  2016, UAE 
  16. IEEE/CAS-EMB Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference, edition 2014
    October 22-24, 2014, Switzerland 
  17. Qatar International Medical Devices & Healthcare Exhibition and Conferences,
    9-11 MARCH 2015, QATAR 
  18. Congress of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care
    August 29-September 02, 2015, Korea
  19. International Symposium on Critical Bleeding 2015
    August 31- September 01, 2015, Denmark
  20. Stem cell and Regenerative Medicine Congress
    September 02-03, 2015, USA
  21. X-ray and Neutron Phase Imaging with Gratings
    September 8-11, 2015, USA
  22. 6th Non-Coding RNA and RNAi Therapeutics;
    September 09-10,2015, USA
  23. Anti-Inflammatory Research and Therapeutics Conference
    September 10-11, 2015, USA
  24.  1st Regional Conference of the SA Health Technology Assessment Society
    September 10-12, 2015, South Africa
  25. Innovation in Medicine and Healthcare 2015
    September 11-12, 2015, Japan

Associations related to technology in Medicine
1. Medical Technology Association of Australia

2. Advanced Medical Technology Association 

3. Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed)

4. American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) 

5. Analytical & Life Science Systems Association (ALSSA) 

6. Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI)

 7. Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP)

 8. Association of Medical Device Reprocessors (AMDR)

9. Association of Medical Diagnostics Manufacturers (AMDM)

 10. Diagnostic Marketing Association (DxMA)


Companies related to technology in Medicine

  1. Medtronic, USA 
  2. Boston Scientific, USA 
  3. Covidien, UK 
  4. Johnson & Johnson, USA 
  5. GE, USA 
  6. Becton Dickinson, USA 
  7. Philips, Netherlands 
  8. Abbott, USA 
  9. Siemens, Germany 
  10. Roche, Switzerland
  11. General Electric Co.
  12. Medtronic Inc.
  13. Novartis
  14. Stryker Corp.
  15. St. Jude Medical Inc.
  16. Smith & Nephew plc.
  17. Toshiba Corp.
  18. CareFusion Corp.
  19. Olympus Corp.
  20. Hologic Inc.

 

 

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 11th Sep, 2015

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