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Recommended Conferences for Guideline Daily Amount

Guideline Daily Amount


As per available reports about 08 Relevant Journals, 11 Conferences, 19 Workshops are presently dedicated exclusively to Guideline Daily Amounts and about 440 Open Acess Articles are being published on Guideline Daily Amounts

Guideline Daily Amounts are guidelines for healthy adults and children about the approximate amount of calories, fat, saturated fat, total sugars, and sodium/salt. GDA labels have the percentage of daily value per serving and the absolute amount per serving of these categories. Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs) are a nutrition facts label that originally began in 1998 as collaboration between the UK government, the food industry and consumer organizations. The process was overseen by the Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD). To help consumers make sense of the nutrition information provided on food labels, they translate science into consumer friendly information, providing guidelines on pack that help consumers put the nutrition information they read on a food label into the context of their overall diet. The labels have the percentage of daily value per serving and the absolute amount per serving of these categories. The front-of-packages (FOP) GDAs must at least have calories listed, but the back-of-package (BOP) GDAs must list, at a minimum, these five. 

Scope and Importance

Since introduction into the world outside the UK there has been controversy on what the GDAs actually show, for example, calculating a personal GDA, which is dependent on a person’s height, weight, amount of daily activity and age, an intake rating which is about 5-10% above what that person should actually be eating and drinking? When calculating the GDAs the CIAA uses the average caloric intake needed for women because this best fits the needs of the majority of the population. Women need, on average, between 1800-2200 calories a day whereas children need 1500-2000 and men 2200-2700. In March 2009, the European Food Safety Authority published its opinion on intake levels for Europe and they were consistent with numbers behind the GDAs developed in the UK. Moreover, not all categories are equal. They are called guidelines because that's exactly what they are – a guide, not a target. Whilst it's OK to stick pretty close to the GDA for calories, you should try to eat no more than the GDA for sugars, fat, saturates (saturated fat) and salt. 

Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs) are a nutrition facts label that originally began in 1998 as a collaboration between the UK government, the food industry and consumer organizations. The process was overseen by the Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD). To help consumers make sense of the nutrition information provided on food labels, they translate science into consumer friendly information, providing guidelines on pack that help consumers put the nutrition information they read on a food label into the context of their overall diet. GDAs are guidelines for healthy adults and children about the approximate amount of calories, fat, saturated fat, total sugars, and sodium/salt. The  GDA  labels have the percentage of daily value per serving and the absolute amount per serving of these categories. The front-of-packages (FOP) GDAs must at least have calories listed, but the back-of-package (BOP) GDAs must list, at a minimum, these five. A modified version of the GDA system was adopted by the Australian food and beverage industry in 2006 and called the 'Daily Intake Guide'. In 2009 the original GDA system was adopted as an industry standard in the European Union and in 2012 a variant was adopted in the US and called 'Facts Up Front'. Since introduction into the world outside the UK there has been controversy on what the GDAs actually show, for example, calculating a personal GDA, which is dependent on a person's height, weight, amount of daily activity and age, an intake rating which is about 5-10% above what that person should actually be eating and drinking. When calculating the GDAs the CIAA uses the average caloric intake needed for women because this best fits the needs of the majority of the population. In March 2009, the European Food Safety Authority published its opinion on intake levels for Europe and they were consistent with numbers behind the GDAs developed in the UK. Moreover, not all categories are equal. While a GDA for calorific intake might represent a broad target in so far as people need to take in a minimum of calories to survive, the GDA for saturated fat is not a target, as ingesting no saturated fats at all would not be harmful to health, so long as there were fats of a non-saturated variety in the diet. GDAs are now in widespread use across the food industry and appear both on the front and back of food packaging.

Market Analysis

In 2005, the food industry came together in a significant pre-competitive move to provide consumers with clearer and more easy to use information on the nutritional content of food and drink products. The system that was developed to illustrate this information on food and drink packages was based on the scientifically accepted Guideline Daily Amount (GDA) standards. GDA is now used on over 60% of all branded food and drink packages and an even higher volume of supermarket 'own label' products. 

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List of Related Societies:

1. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
2. American Society of Nutrition
3. The Royal Society of New Zealand
4. Massachusetts Medical Society
5. United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition
6. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
7. International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
8. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
9. International Union of Nutritional Sciences
10. The NCMHD Center of Excellence for Nutritional Genomics
11. Society of Chemistry and the Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food
12. Entomological Society of America
13. Romanian Society for Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition
14. Bionutrient Food Association
15. Federation of European Biochemical Societies
16. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition
17. International Association for Cereal Chemistry
18. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
19. Society of Chemistry and the Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food
20. Royal Society

List of Related Companies:

1. Unilever
2. Copal
3. Puratos
4. Drugs.com
5. Cannabis Cure
6. Sharp Healthcare
7. CRC Health Group
8. Nestlé: Personalised Nutrition
9. Nutrilite
10. Nestle
11. MLO Sports Nutrition
12. Hershey Foods
13. Danone
14. Chicago Tofu
15. Unipro
16. Nanjing Yurun Food CO LTD
17. Cadbury
18. Pharma Sweet Company
19. NABISCO Biscuits Co
20. Well’s Dairy Inc.

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 14th Sep, 2015

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