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Recommended Conferences for Food Shelf Life

Food Shelf Life


OMICS International has 3 Journals related to Food Science. It has published 342 Open Access articles along with 559 conference proceedings, 20 upcoming conferences related to Food Science. Moreover, around 20 Upcoming conferences along with 29 symposiums are going to be hosted all across the globe related to Food Science.


Food Shelf Life is the time it takes a food product to deteriorate to an unacceptable degree under specific storage, processing, and packaging.

OMICS International Organizes 1000+ Global Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more Scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 100000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board and organizing committee members. The Conference Series website will provide you list and details about the conferences organized across the globe.

The shelf life of a food depends on
• How it is processed
• How it is stored
• How it is packaged

Time to Deteriorate is relative to
• Product composition
• Storage conditions
• Processing conditions
• Distribution conditions
• Initial quality
• Packaging
• Temperature
• Atmosphere

Selected Measurable Food Quality Factors depends on
• Microbial counts and types
• Nutrient content
• Color & appearance
• Moisture content
• Physical shape/size
• Mechanical properties
• Flavor panel score
• Toxicant level (chemical risk)
• DAL (e.g. insect fragments)

Biological Modes of Food Deterioration:
•Microorganisms
• Spoilage
• Pathogenic
• Insects
• Rodents

Chemical Modes of Food Deterioration :
• Oxidation
• Flavor deterioration
• Color change or loss
• Vitamin loss
• Chemical contamination
• Enzymatic

Physical Modes of Food Deterioration:
• Moisture gain or loss
• Breakage or clumping
• Textural changes

Major Goal of Packaging
• Reduce the rate of quality loss


Recent Packaging Technologies to extend shelf life
• Higher barrier packaging
Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)
• Direct addition of CO2 to products
• Broader use of irradiation
• New processes (e.g. high pressure, ohmic, pulsed light, etc.)

Examples of Emerging Packaging Technologies which may extend shelf life
• Antimicrobial Materials
Bio-Active Materials
• Selective & Adjusting Barriers
• Indicating & Sensing Materials
• Flavor Maintenance & Enhancing Materials
 

Scope and Importance:
Implementation of traceability requirement- Identification of suppliers and customers by food business operators. A food business operator should be able to identify any “person” from whom it received its food/raw materials. This person can be an individual (for example a hunter or a mushroom collector) or a legal person.
Examples of traceability tools and labels
Sheep and goat tag, Lithuania
• Initials of the Animal Recording Centre (Agriculture Information and Rural Business Development Centre)
• Country code
• 6-digit individual animal identification number

Label on beef steak, Belgium
• Traceability bar code
• Country where animal was born
• Country where animal was fattened
• Country where animal was slaughtered

Label on oranges, Belgium
• Origin
• Category
• Weight
• Traceability code
• Internal traceability

Food business operators should be encouraged to develop systems of internal traceability designed in relation to the nature of their activities (food processing, storage, distribution etc). An internal traceability system will benefit the operator by contributing to more targeted and accurate withdrawals (avoid unnecessary wider disruption).

Types of information to be kept
The first category which shall be made available to the competent Authorities in all cases:
• Name, address of supplier, nature of products which were supplied from him.
• Name, address of customer, nature of products that were delivered to that customer.
• Date of transaction / delivery.

The second category includes
Additional information which is highly recommended to be kept:
• Volume or quantity
• Batch number, if any.
• More detailed description of the product (pre-packed or bulk product, variety of fruit/vegetable, raw or processed product).

Time of records keeping
For products without a specified shelf life, the general rule of 5 years applies;
For products with a shelf life above 5 years, records should be kept for the period of the shelf-life plus 6 months;
For highly perishable products, which have a “use by” date less than 3 months or without a specified date, destined directly to final consumer, records should be kept for the period of 6 months after date of manufacturing or delivery.
In practice, traceability systems are record keeping procedures that show the path of a particular unit or batch of product or ingredient from supplier(s), through all the intermediate steps which process and combine ingredients into new products, and through the supply chain to customers and perhaps ultimately to consumers.

The Food traceability (tracking technologies) market is growing at a healthy rate with increasing awareness about food safety among governments and consumers. Governments across the globe are making regulations to track food as it is directly concerned with consumer health. An outbreak of food borne disease can have a direct impact on the national budget and the governments want to avoid the same. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for making food traceability laws as it is estimated that 3,000 people die every year due to food borne diseases.

However, the food traceability requires some investment on the part of the various stakeholders of the supply chain. It has been observed that small stakeholders are not actively participating in the traceability which disrupts the flow of food tracking. It is a challenge for big players to create awareness to encourage participation from these small players.

The new market research report titled "Food Traceability Market (Tracking Technologies) Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Trends, Opportunities and Forecast, 2012 - 2020" is published today by Allied Market Research. As per the market study, the global food traceability market (tracking technologies) is expected to grow at a CAGR of 8.7% during the analysis period, reaching expected revenue of $14.1 billion by 2020. The RFID technology is expected to grow at the highest rate of 19.4% among all technologies of food traceability market. The reason for the high growth rate of RFID is real-time tracking of food items irrespective of weather conditions or location. Accurate read-write ability in complex environment is also a significant advantage of this technology.

Food traceability is becoming a norm for all food producers across the globe as a result of consumer demands and government regulations concerning food safety. Early adoption of food tracking technologies in developed nations such as the U.S., Japan and Australia has led to good market revenues. However, globalization of the food market has increased the importance of a traceability system even in developing nations and therein lie the opportunities for food traceability suppliers to enhance their market position.

List of Best International Conferences 
• 12th Food Technology Conference October 24-26, 2016, Istanbul, Turkey
• Food Preservation Conference March 31-April 01, 2016, Atlanta, USA
• Plant Science Conference October 31-November 02, 2016, Baltimore, USA
• 8th Global Food Processing Conference November 09-11, 2015, Dubai, UAE
• 7th Food and Beverages conference October 08-10, 2015 New Delhi, India
• 9th Food and Beverages Conference July 11-13, 2016, Cologne, Germany
• 2nd Food Safety and Regulatory Measures Conference , June 06-08, 2016, London, UK
• 5th Agriculture Conference June 27-29, 2016, Cape Town, South Africa
• Food Microbiology Conference August 08-10, 2016, Birmingham, UK
• 5th Probiotics, Functional and Baby Foods Conference , September 26-28, 2016
   Miami, USA
• 3rd Aquaculture Conference , Sept 29- Oct 1, 2016, London, UK
• 2nd Aquaculture Conference , July 11-13, 2016 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
• Food Pack Expo, USA
• International Food Safety and Public Health Conference, UAE
• Global Food Expo, Turkey
• 107th AOCS Annual Meeting, USA
• 15th International Cereal and Bread Congress, Turkey
• 4th International Symposium on Gluten-Free Food Products and Beverages, Canada
• Alimentaria Barcelona 2016, Spain
• Food and Hotel Asia 2016 (FHA2016), Germany
• Foodtech Packtech 2016, New Zealand
• IUFoST 18th World Congress, Ireland

List of Associations/Societies 
• Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection, Germany
• ISEKI Food Association, Austria
• Institute of Food Research, U.K
• Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain
• Belgian Association of Food Technology, Belgium
• Central Food Research Institute, India
• Centre for Advanced Food Studies, Denmark
• Czech Committee for Food Science and Technology, Czech Republic
• Food research Institute Albania, Albania
• German Federation of Food Science and Technology, Germany
• National Institute for Agriculture Research in Tunis, Tunisia
• Spanish Council for Scientific Research, Spain
• The Institute of Food Science and Technology of Ireland, Ireland
• Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, U.K
• European Food Safety Authority, EU, Italy
• Food Standards Agency, U.K

List of Companies
• Cargill, USA
• Nestle, India
• Archer Daniels Midland, USA
• PepsiCo Inc., USA
• Kraft Foods Inc., USA
• The Coca-Cola Company, USA
• Anheuser-Busch InBev, Belgium
• Tyson Foods Inc., USA
• Unilever Plc/Unilever NV, U.K
• Mars Inc., USA
• SABMiller Plc, U.K
• Kirin Brewery Company Ltd, Japan
• Heineken N.V., The Netherlands
• Lactalis, France
• Asahi Breweries Ltd., Japan
• Associated British Food, U.K
• Diageo Plc, U.K
• Fonterra, New Zealand
• General Mills Inc., USA
• Kellogg Company, USA
• FrieslandCampina NV, The Netherlands
• Vion, The Netherlands

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 11th Sep, 2015

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