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Diabetic ketoacidosis


As per available reports about 10 Relevant Journals, 6 Conferences, 4 National Symposiums are presently dedicated exclusively to Diabetic Ketoacidosis and about 7 articles are being published on Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with Type 1 diabetes has, but it can occur in those with type 2 diabetes under certain circumstances. DKA results from a shortage of insulin, in response the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies that cause most of the symptoms and complications. The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The other signs and symptoms of DKA are generalized weakness, fatigability, nausea; vomiting, rapid weight loss, decreased perspiration and this may be undercurrent illness pneumonia, influenza, gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection.

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 Scope and importance

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is rapidly affecting the people, yet the systematic application of current knowledge to improve patient care remains a formidable challenge. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) arises because of a lack of insulin in the body. DKA is common in type 1 diabetes as this form of diabetes is associated with an absolute lack of insulin production by the islets of Langerhans. In type 2 diabetes, insulin production is present but is insufficient to meet the body's requirements as a result of end-organ insulin resistance The most common mechanism is relative insulin deficiency (insulinopaenia) and usual triggers are non-concordance or infection. Treatment is exactly the same as in type 1 diabetes with intravenous fluid resuscitation and insulin, though the duration of treatment may not be as long. These patients are able to stop insulin following resolution of ketoacidosis and can be managed on oral hypoglycaemic agents. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this condition due to the increasing burden of type 2 diabetes and to avoid unnecessary treatment with insulin in the long term.

 Old Content

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with Type 1 diabetes has, but it can occur in those with type 2 diabetes under certain circumstances. DKA results from a shortage of insulin, in response the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies that cause most of the symptoms and complications. The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The other signs and symptoms of DKA are generalized weakness, fatigability, nausea; vomiting, rapid weight loss, decreased perspiration and this may be undercurrent illness pneumonia, influenza, gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is rapidly affecting the people, yet the systematic application of current knowledge to improve patient care remains a formidable challenge. National symposiums and Workshops provide a dedicated forum for the advancement, implementation and exchange of information about DKA and its allied areas. Many Organizations are getting involved in conducting symposiums and workshops to share awareness about DKA, which includes International society for pediatric and adolescent diabetes (ISPAD), National Institute for Health Research (NHS), Royal College of Pediatrics & Child Health, Diabetics Teaching Center UCSF, and Death to Diabetes.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) arises because of a lack of insulin in the body. DKA is common in type 1 diabetes as this form of diabetes is associated with an absolute lack of insulin production by the islets of Langerhans. In type 2 diabetes, insulin production is present but is insufficient to meet the body's requirements as a result of end-organ insulin resistance. Usually, these amounts of insulin are sufficient to suppress ketogenesis. If DKA occurs in someone with type 2 diabetes, their condition is called "ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes". The exact mechanism for this phenomenon is unclear, but there is evidence both of impaired insulin secretion and insulin action. Once the condition has been treated, insulin production resumes and often the patient may be able to resume diet or tablet treatment as normally recommended in type 2 diabetes. The clinical state of DKA is associated, in addition to the above, with the release of various counter regulatory hormones such as glucagon and adrenaline as well as cytokines, the latter of which leads to increased markers of inflammation, even in the absence of infection.

Market Analysis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) a hyperglycemic crisis most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is often the first symptom of diabetes to appear in the undiagnosed population. Managing the condition effectively to prevent incidence is important because of the associated morbidity and resulting economic impact. Studies have shown that hospitalizations resulting from DKA amount to an annual cost of more than $2.4 billion in the United States. In the largest multinational analysis of diabetic ketoacidosis in pediatric type 1 diabetes patients, T1D Exchange researchers found consistently high rates and common risk factors for DKA across five countries, confirming that DKA a largely preventable condition remains a serious threat for type 1 diabetes patients

The analysis also highlights the considerable costs associated with treating DKA, which creates a serious financial burden for healthcare systems, patients, and families. Researchers examined data from nearly 50,000 pediatric type 1 diabetes patients ages two through 18 via three massive databases: the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry, the most comprehensive type 1 diabetes database in the U.S., comprising more than 27,000 patients from 76 pediatric and adult endocrinology centers; the Diabetes Prospective Follow-up (DPV) registry, which has more than 40,000 patients from 209 centers in Germany and Austria; and the National Pediatric Diabetes Audit (NPDA) of nearly 16,350 patients who attend pediatric diabetes units in England and Wales.

List of best International Conferences:

  1. 4th Nephrology Conference
    September 14-16, 2015, USA
  2. 3rd Endocrinology  Conference
    November  02-04,  2015, USA
  3. 11th Targeting  Diabetes  Conference
    October  17-19,  2016, Malaysia
  4. 6th Endocrinology  Conference
    November  28-30,  2016;  USA
  5. 6th Diabetes Conference
    November  02-04,  2015, UAE
  6. 8th Euro  Diabetes  Conference
    November  03-05,  2015, Spain
  7. 10th European  Diabetes  Conference
    July  14-16,  2016, UK
  8. 7th Indo Diabetes Conference
    November  23-25,  2015, India
  9. Thyroid Disorders  and treatment Conference
    February 29-March 02, 2016,  USA
  10. 9th Diabetologists Conference
    June 06-08, 2016, USA. 
  11. 2nd  Hormones  and  Steroids  Conference
    June  23-25,  2016, USA
  12. 11th Asia  Pacific  Diabetes  Conference
    July  11-13,  2016, Australia
  13. 12th Diabetes  Conference
    September  29-October  1,  2016,  Canada
  14. 13th Diabetes  Conference 
    August  08-10,  2016, UK
  15. Metabolic Syndrome Conference
    October  20-22,  2016, UAE 
  16. Type 2 Diabetes and Diabetes Surgery conference
    September 28- 30, 2015, UK
  17. French Society of Endocrinology conference
    October7- 10, 2015, France
  18. Endocrinology and Diabetes conference
    October 22- 24, 2015, Chile
  19. 15th Thyroid conference
    October 18- 23, 2015, USA
  20. Diabetes Eye Complications conference
    June 16- 18, 2016, UK

 List of Related Societies

  1. Asthma Clinical Research Centers
  2. New Zealand Association of Clinical Research (NZACRes)
  3. Norwich Clinical Research Associates
  4. Association of Clinical Trials Organizations (ACTO) 
  5. International Society for Translational Medicine
  6. Clinical Research Society
  7. American Association for Cancer Research 
  8. The Association for Clinical and Translational Science
  9. Clinical Research Associates, Inc.
  10. Society of Clinical Research Associates, Inc
  11. Translational Medicine Associates, LLC (TMA)
  12. Association of Experimental Stroke and Translational Medicine
  13. Indian Society for Clinical Research
  14. Association of Clinical Research Organization
  15. Clinical Contract Research Association (CCRA) 
  16. Association of Clinical Research Professionals
  17. Clinical Research Association of Canada 
  18. Clinical Research Association
  19. Society for Clinical Trials
  20. National Stroke Association Clinical Trials 

 List of Related Companies

  1. Pfizer Inc
  2. Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc
  3. Eli Lilly and Company
  4. ACTAVIS
  5. Cephalon, Inc
  6. Califia Bio
  7. Glycadia Pharmaceuticals
  8. Cigna
  9. Cebix
  10. Neurometrix
  11. MEDA Pharma GmbH & Co. KG
  12. GlaxoSmithKline
  13. NeuroMetrix, Inc
  14. Sanofi-Aventis
  15. Novo Nordisk
  16. MedScape
  17. DiaTribe
  18. Avail Clinical research
  19. Clinicaltrails.gov
  20. UK Diabetes Industry

 

 

 

 

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 11th Sep, 2015

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