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Recommended Conferences for civil -war-medicine

civil -war-medicine


OMICS International through its Open Access Initiative is committed to make genuine and reliable contributions to the scientific community. OMICS International hosted 3 open access articles Open Access articles, 4 Scientific conference Proceedings , 6 national symposiums and 2 speakers on Key word Civil War Medicine in Global Events page. Global Events of Conference series make the perfect platform for global networking as it brings together renowned speakers and scientists across the globe to a most exciting and memorable scientific event filled with much enlightening interactive sessions, world class exhibitions of OMICS International Conferences

Medical care during the Civil war was rather primitive. Morphine and opium based drugs are used. The state of medical knowledge at the time of the Civil war was extremely primitive. Substances such as Mercury were used often as a treatment for all sorts of problems. If you felt sick treated with mercury, well they gave you something called calomel which was nothing more than honey and chalk with mercury mixed into it. Doctors did not understand infection, and did little to prevent it. It was a time before antiseptics, and a time when there was no attempt to maintain sterility during surgery. No antibiotics were available, and minor wounds could easily become infected, and hence fatal. While the typical soldier was at very high risk of being shot and killed in combat, he faced an even greater risk of dying from disease. During the Civil war, both sides were devastated by battle and disease. Nurses, surgeons, and physicians rose to the challenge of healing a nation and advanced medicine into the modern age.

From the stench of putrefying flesh wafting through unsanitary and crowded camps to the unglamorous illnesses of syphilis and dysentery, our modern disgust toward Civil war medical practices is generally justified.

However, while “advanced” or “hygienic” may not be terms attributed to medicine in the nineteenth century, modern hospital practices and treatment methods owe much to the legacy of Civil war of the approximately 620,000 soldiers who died in the war, two-thirds of these deaths were not the result of enemy fire, but of a force stronger than any army of men: disease. Combating disease as well treating the legions of wounded soldiers pushed Americans to rethink their theories on health and develop efficient practices to care for the sick and wounded.

The sheer quantity of those who suffered from disease and severe wounds during the Civil war forced the army and medical practitioners to develop new therapies, technologies and practices to combat death. Thanks to Hammond’s design of clean, well ventilated and large pavilion-style hospitals, suffering soldiers received care that was efficient and sanitary. In the later years of the war, these hospitals had a previously unheard of 8% mortality rate for their patients.
 

Conferences:

Medical Devices Conference
Biomedical Conference
Medical Imaging Conference
Medical Writing Conference
Biomedical Engineering Conference
Biopharmaceutics Conference
European Pharma Conference
Clinical Pharmacy Conference
Pharma Middle East Conference
Pharmaco Vigillance Conference
Neuro Pharmacology Conference
• Twenty-Second Conference on Medicine
• 10th Evil and Human Wickedness Conference
• Fetal Medicine Cairo 2007 Conference
• 11th Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness Conference
• Supply Chain for Disasters Conference
Socities :

• Indiana state medical association
• Society of surgeons.
• Augusta and the civil war symposium series
• Civil war? maine, florida medical associations battling over ama role in health reform.
• The american medical association and race.
• Cascade Civil war society.
• Civil-war-medicine- Maryland National Road Association
• American Civil war association.
• North California medical society

Companies :

• RMS MS Contin
• Endo Pharmaceuticals
• Carbex.
• Benforce M
• Minitide
• Reglide
• Rezult.
• Zolmelis
• Jalra
• Chromet
Medical care during the Civil war was rather primitive. Morphine and opium based drugs are used. The state of medical knowledge at the time of the Civil war was extremely primitive. Substances such as Mercury were used often as a treatment for all sorts of problems. If you felt sick treated with mercury, well they gave you something called calomel which was nothing more than honey and chalk with mercury mixed into it. Doctors did not understand infection, and did little to prevent it. It was a time before antiseptics, and a time when there was no attempt to maintain sterility during surgery. No antibiotics were available, and minor wounds could easily become infected, and hence fatal. While the typical soldier was at very high risk of being shot and killed in combat, he faced an even greater risk of dying from disease. During the Medical care during the Civil war was rather primitive. Morphine and opium based drugs are used. The state of medical knowledge at the time of the Civil war was extremely primitive. Substances such as Mercury were used often as a treatment for all sorts of problems. If you felt sick treated with mercury, well they gave you something called calomel which was nothing more than honey and chalk with mercury mixed into it. Doctors did not understand infection, and did little to prevent it. It was a time before antiseptics, and a time when there was no attempt to maintain sterility during surgery. No antibiotics were available, and minor wounds could easily become infected, and hence fatal. While the typical soldier was at very high risk of being shot and killed in combat, he faced an even greater risk of dying from disease. During the Civil war, both sides were devastated by battle and disease. Nurses, surgeons, and physicians rose to the challenge of healing a nation and advanced medicine into the modern age.

From the stench of putrefying flesh wafting through unsanitary and crowded camps to the unglamorous illnesses of syphilis and dysentery, our modern disgust toward Civil war medical practices is generally justified.

However, while “advanced” or “hygienic” may not be terms attributed to medicine in the nineteenth century, modern hospital practices and treatment methods owe much to the legacy of Civil war of the approximately 620,000 soldiers who died in the war, two-thirds of these deaths were not the result of enemy fire, but of a force stronger than any army of men: disease. Combating disease as well treating the legions of wounded soldiers pushed Americans to rethink their theories on health and develop efficient practices to care for the sick and wounded.

The wounded and sick suffered from the haphazard hospitalization systems that existed at the start of the Civil war. As battles ended, the wounded were rushed down railroad lines to nearby cities and towns, where doctors and nurses coped with the onslaught of dying men in makeshift hospitals. These hospitals saw a great influx of wounded from both sides and the wounded and dying filled the available facilities to the brim. The Fairfax Seminary, for example, opened its doors twenty years prior to the war with only fourteen students, but it housed an overwhelming 1,700 sick and wounded soldiers during the course of the war.

However, the heavy and constant demands of the sick and wounded sped up the technological progression of medicine, wrenching American medical practices into the light of modernity. Field and pavilion hospitals replaced makeshift ones and efficient hospitalization systems encouraged the accumulation of medical records and reports, which slowed bad practices as accessible knowledge spread the use of beneficial treatments.

Several key figures played a role in the progression of medicine at this time. Jonathan Letterman, the Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac, brought “order and efficiency in to the Medical Service” with a regulated ambulance system and evacuation plans for the wounded. As surgeon general of the Union army, William A. Hammond standardized, organized and designed new hospital layouts and inspection systems and literally wrote the book on hygiene for the army. Clara Barton, well-known humanitarian and founder of the American Red Cross, brought professional efficiency to soldiers in the field, especially at the Battle of Antietam in September of 1862 when she delivered much-needed medical supplies and administered relief and care for the wounded. Disease and illness took a heavy toll on soldiers, but as these historic characters show, every effort was made to prevent death caused by human error and ignorance through the development of organized and more advanced practices.

The sheer quantity of those who suffered from disease and severe wounds during the Medical care during the Civil war was rather primitive. Morphine and opium based drugs are used. The state of medical knowledge at the time of the Civil war was extremely primitive. Substances such as Mercury were used often as a treatment for all sorts of problems. If you felt sick treated with mercury, well they gave you something called calomel which was nothing more than honey and chalk with mercury mixed into it. Doctors did not understand infection, and did little to prevent it. It was a time before antiseptics, and a time when there was no attempt to maintain sterility during surgery. No antibiotics were available, and minor wounds could easily become infected, and hence fatal. While the typical soldier was at very high risk of being shot and killed in combat, he faced an even greater risk of dying from disease. During the Medical care during the Civil war was rather primitive. Morphine and opium based drugs are used. The state of medical knowledge at the time of the Civil war was extremely primitive. Substances such as Mercury were used often as a treatment for all sorts of problems. If you felt sick treated with mercury, well they gave you something called calomel which was nothing more than honey and chalk with mercury mixed into it. Doctors did not understand infection, and did little to prevent it. It was a time before antiseptics, and a time when there was no attempt to maintain sterility during surgery. No antibiotics were available, and minor wounds could easily become infected, and hence fatal. While the typical soldier was at very high risk of being shot and killed in combat, he faced an even greater risk of dying from disease. During the Civil war, both sides were devastated by battle and disease. Nurses, surgeons, and physicians rose to the challenge of healing a nation and advanced medicine into the modern age.

OMICS Group International through its Open Access Initiative is committed to make genuine and reliable contributions to the scientific community. OMICS Group hosts over 350 leading-edge peer reviewed Open Access journalsand has organized over 100 scientific conferences all over the world. OMICS Publishing Group journals have over 3 million readers and the fame and success of the same can be attributed to the strong editorial board which contains over 30000 eminent personalities and the rapid, quality and quick review processing. OMICS Group Conferences make the perfect platform for global networking as it brings together renowned speakers and scientists across the globe to a most exciting and memorable scientific event filled with much enlightening interactive sessions, world class exhibitions and poster presentations.

Conferences :

  • Protein Engineering Conference October 26-28, 2015 Chicago, USA
  • 7th Vaccines Middle East Conference September 28-29, 2015 Dubai, UAE
  • 13th  Vaccines Asia Pacific Conference November 10-12, 2016 Melbourne, Australia
  •  9th Vaccines 2015 November 30-December 02, 2015 San Francisco, USA
  •  10th Euro Vaccines Conference June 16-18, 2016 Rome, Italy.
  •  Hepatities Vaccines Conference June 16-18, 2016 Rome, Italy
  •  Hiv Vaccines Conference Oct 3-5, 2016 Miami, USA
  • Vaccines USA Conference November 30-December 02, 2015 San Francisco, USA
  • 7th Proteomics Conference October 10-12, 2016 Rome, Italy
  • 6th World Proteomics Conference March 29-30, 2016 Atlanta, USA
  • VTH-2015 November 02-04, 2015 HICC, Hyderabad, India
  • Travel Medicine & Vaccines May 9-11, 2016 San Francisco, USA
  • H1N1 & Influenza Vaccines July 25-26, 2016 Chicago, USA
  • Children Vaccines 2016 Oct 10-12, 2016 Rome, Italy
  • Mucosal Immunology July 28-29, 2016 Melbourne, Australia
  • 4th Immunology conference September 28-30, 2015 Houston, Texas, USA
  • Tumour Immunology and Immunotherapy July 28-30, 2016 Melbourne, Australia
  • 2nd Neuroimmunology and Therapeutics March 31-April 02, 2016 Atlanta, USA
  • Twenty-Second Conference on Proteins
  • 10th Proteins Conference
  • Medical Proteomics Conference
  • Protein Application Conference
  • Fetal Medicine Cairo 2007
  •  11th Global Conference Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness
  •  International conference on Facilitation of Supply Chain for Disasters
  •  11th WSEAS Int. Conf. on Neural Networks (NN10)
  •  East Coast Paranormal Investigators Conference 2009
  •  ISOCS-26. 26th International Symposium on the Organic Chemistry of Sulfur
  •  International Conference on Arts and Humanities- 2014 (ICOAH 2014)
  •  The First Asian Conference on Politics, Economics and Law 2013
  •  13th Tetrahedron Symposium (Asia) a Challenges in Bioorganic Organic Medicinal Chemistry.
     
  • Symposiums :
  • • Technology and the Conduct of the American
  • • The American Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society.
  • • Hospital for Special Surgery, Founded During the , Celebrates 150 Years with Symposium.
  • • 18th Annual Symposium: The in 1864.
  • • Medicine November 8, 2014
  • • Augusta and the Symposium Series 1863.
  • • American Medicine & Surgical Antiques
  • • Medical Symposium – Virginia
  • • Redlands: symposium
  •  
  • Workshops :
  • • WVSOM offers Medicine workshop and walking tour for experience WV participants.
  • • Second Annual Medicine Living Historians Workshop
  • • Living historians workshop.
  • • The national museum of medicine’s second annual living historians’ workshop.
  • • Annual living historians workshop
  • • WVSOM hosting medicine workshop
  • • Medicine workshop at brandy Station.
  • • Traveling exhibit on medicine.
  • • Medical interpretive workshop
  • • Steam workshop : item changes/improvements
  •  
  • Socities :
  • • Wood lake battlefield
  • • Indiana state medical association
  • • Society of surgeons.
  • • Augusta and the civil war symposium series
  • • Civil war? maine, florida medical associations battling over ama role in health reform.
  • • The american medical association and race.
  • • Cascade Civil war society.
  • • Civil-war-medicine- Maryland National Road Association
  • • American Civil war association.
  • • North California medical society
  •  
  • Companies :
  • • RMS MS Contin
  • • Endo Pharmaceuticals
  • • Carbex.
  • • Benforce M
  • • Minitide
  • • Reglide
  • • Rezult.
  • • Zolmelis
  • • Jalra
  • • Chromet

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 08th Sep, 2015

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