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Recommended Conferences for Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease


Omics International publishes 281 Open Access Articles in 4 International Journals it has 2 Upcoming Conferences and 3 Previous Conferences with 710 Conference Proceedings and 76 National symposiums so far in the field..

Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60% to 70% of cases of dementia. It is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The most common early symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events. As the disease advances, symptoms can include problems with language, disorientation, mood swings, and loss of motivation, not managing self-care, and behavioural issues. About 70% of the risk is believed to be genetic with many genes usually involved. Other risk factors include a history of head injuries, depression, or hypertension.

OMICS International through its Open access initiatives is committed to make genuine and reliable contributions to the scientific community by publishing research work and conference paper related to such disorders. It is known that OMICS Group hosts over 700 edge peer reviewed Open Access Journals which contains over 75000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members. Omics International organizes over more than 1000 Global Events annually with support from 1000 more scientific Societies. Its publishing group journals have over 5 million readers and the fame and success of the same can be attributed to the strong editorial board that ensure a quality and quick review process checker.

Scope:

The National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (NINCDS) and the Alzheimer's disease and Related Disorders Association (ADRDA) established the most commonly used NINCDS-ADRDA Alzheimer's Criteria for diagnosis in 1984, extensively updated in 2007. These criteria require that the presence of cognitive impairment, and a suspected dementia syndrome, be confirmed by neuropsychological testing for a clinical diagnosis of possible or probable AD. A histopathology confirmation including a microscopic examination of brain tissue is required for a definitive diagnosis. Good statistical reliability and validity have been shown between the diagnostic criteria and definitive histopathological confirmation. Eight cognitive domains are most commonly impaired in AD memory, language, perceptual skills, attention, constructive abilities, orientation, problem solving and functional abilities. These domains are equivalent to the NINCDS-ADRDA Alzheimer's Criteria as listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders published by the American Psychiatric Association.

List of Best International Conferences:

5th Neurology Congress
March 14-16, 2016 London, UK

5th Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia Conference
September 29-Oct 1, 2016 London, UK

2nd Brain Disorders Conference
October 27-29, 2016 Chicago, USA

2nd Neurological Disorders and Stroke Conference
April 28-30, 2016 Dubai, UAE

4th Vascular Dementia Conference
June 30-July 2, 2016 Valencia, Spain

2nd Parkinson’s disease and Movement Disorders Conference
November 28-30 Chicago USA

2nd Depression, Anxiety and Stress Management Meeting
November 3-4, 2016 Valencia, Spain

3rd Euro Psychiatry Conference
September 7-9, 2016 Amsterdam, Netherlands

Autism Conference
May 5-6, 2016 Chicago, USA

6th World Neurological conference
May 19-21, 2016 San Antonio, USA

10th International Conference on Front temporal Dementias
31 August - 2 September 2016 Munich, Germany

14th International Athens/Springfield Symposium on Advances in Alzheimer Therapy
9-12 March 2016 Athens, Greece 24-28 July 2016 Toronto, Canada

Alzheimer's Association International Conference
22-28 July 2016, Toronto, Canada

31st International Conference of Alzheimer's disease International
21 - 24 April 2016 Budapest, Hungary

Alzheimer’s disease is not the only cause of memory loss or other dementia-like symptoms. Some problems can be reversed if they are caused by treatable conditions like depression, drug interaction, thyroid problems, vitamin deficiencies, or excess use of alcohol. Symptoms caused by Alzheimer’s disease cannot be cured, but medications are available that may slow the course of the illness. Most current drugs work best when they are taken early in the disease. New drugs are under development; there is always reason to have hope. Alzheimer’s is a disease of the brain that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. It is not a normal part of aging. Alzheimer’s gets worse over time. Although symptoms can vary widely, the first problem many people notice is forgetfulness severe enough to affect their ability to function at home or at work, or to enjoy lifelong hobbies. The disease may cause a person to become confused, lost in familiar places, misplace things or have trouble with language.

Confusion is common, and people with Alzheimer’s disease may mix up appointments, think they are a different age than they are, or believe that they are late for work when they have been retired for years.

Alzheimer’s is a growing problem - 15% of people over age 65 are affected, and 40% of those over age 85. While much less common, Alzheimer’s disease can occur in younger people as well.

Although there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s, researchers are working to develop new treatments. Research has also shown that effective care and support can improve the quality of life for both patients and their caregivers.

Warning Signs and Symptoms

1. Memory loss

2. Difficulty performing familiar tasks

3. Problems with language

4. Confusion about time and place

5. Poor or decreased judgment

6. Problems with abstract thinking

7. Misplacing or hiding things

8. Changes in mood or behavior

9. Changes in personality

10. Loss of initiative

Diagnosis and Treatment

For persons with dementia, an early diagnosis has many advantages including:

  • Relief from anxiety about unknown problems
  • A better chance to benefit from treatment
  • Time to plan for the future and get legal and financial affairs in order
  • Information to help improve his or her quality of life

Alzheimer’s disease is not the only cause of memory loss or other dementia-like symptoms. Some problems can be reversed if they are caused by treatable conditions like depression, drug interaction, thyroid problems, vitamin deficiencies, or excess use of alcohol. Symptoms caused by Alzheimer’s disease cannot be cured, but medications are available that may slow the course of the illness. Most current drugs work best when they are taken early in the disease. New drugs are under development; there is always reason to have hope.

Companies:

1.      TJX, MA, USA

2.      Gen worth Financial, Richmond, USA

Market analysis:

In 2010, there were between 21 and 35 million people worldwide with AD. It most often begins in people over 65 years of age; although 4% to 5% of cases are early-onset Alzheimer's which begin before this. It affects about 6% of people 65 years and older. In 2010, dementia resulted in about 486,000 deaths. It was first described by, and later named after, German psychiatrist and pathologist Aloes Alzheimer in 1906. In developed countries, AD is one of the most financially costly diseases. In the United States, Alzheimer prevalence was estimated to be 1.6% in 2000 both overall and in the 65-74 age groups, with the rate increasing to 19% in the 75–84 groups and to 42% in the greater than 84 group. Prevalence rates in less developed regions are lower. The World Health Organization estimated that in 2005, 0.379% of people worldwide had dementia, and that the prevalence would increase to 0.441% in 2015 and to 0.556% in 2030. Other studies have reached similar conclusions. Another study estimated that in 2006, 0.40% of the world population were afflicted by AD, and that the prevalence rate would triple and the absolute number would quadruple by 2050.

This page will be updated regularly.

This page was last updated on 11th Sep, 2015

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